Roger M. Blench/Stuart McGill: Advances in Minority Language Research in Nigeria vol. I [PDF]

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Description

2012
XXIV, 372 pp.
10 maps, 28 b/w photos, numerous tables and graphs

Text language: English

This volume is a collection of articles based on papers which have been presented at the monthly Jos Linguistics Circle, held in the city of Jos in central Nigeria, together with an overview chapter surveying current linguistics research and language develop­ment in Nigeria.

The twelve articles are all written by specialists in Nigerian lan­guages and treat a wide range of subjects. General linguistics topics include phonetics (Biu-Mandara labio­coronals, inter­den­tal approximants in Bauchi, and the ex­plosive bilabial nasal of Ninkyop), phonology (vowel length in C’Lela and word-initial gemination in Cicipu), morpho­syntax (focus strategies in Rigwe, tense/­aspect/­manner marking in Ukaan, and verbal nouns in Jukun), semantics (of ut‑Ma’in noun classes), and dis­course (informa­tion structure encoded by verbal morphology in Central Kambari). Other chapters have socio­linguistic and interdisciplinary themes, including archaeology, Tarok oral traditions, and the use of Arabic script in present-day Nigeria.

The focus is on the minority languages of Nigeria: many of the languages discussed are severely underdescribed despite their fascinating properties, and this book will be a valuable resource for africanists and typologists alike.

CONTENTS

Roger Blench / Stuart McGill:
Preface

Part I – Introduction

Chapter I – Roger Blench:
Research and development of Nigerian minority languages

Part II – General issues

Chapter II – Roger Blench:
Understanding Nigerian prehistory through its linguistic geography

Chapter III – Matthew Harley:
Unusual sounds in Nigerian languages

Chapter IV – Selbut Longtau:
Their tongues still speak loud

Chapter V – Andy Warren-Rothlin:
Arabic script in modern Nigeria

Part III – Morphosyntax in the Nigerian Middle Belt

Chapter VI – Daniel Gya:
Focus in Rigwe syntax

Chapter VII – Sophie Salffner:
Tense, aspect and manner encoding in Ikaan

Chapter VIII – Anne Storch:
Jukun verbal nouns

Part IV – Topics in Kainji linguistics

Chapter IX – Stephen Dettweiler:
The case for writing vowel length in C’Lela

Chapter X – Rebecca Smith Paterson:
The semantics of ut Ma’in noun classes

Chapter XI – Stuart McGill:
The development of long consonants in Cicipu

Chapter XII – David Crozier:
From verb morphology to discourse in Central Kambari